State Dept Project Signals Foreign Policy Shift

State Dept Project Signals Foreign Policy Shift: Review Could Shift Resources to Civilian Agencies for Foreign Development, by Spencer Ackerman, 22 October 2009, in The Washington Independent.

In July, [State Department's director of policy planning Anne-Marie] Slaughter's boss, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, announced a new planning and budgeting document, called the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review, or QDDR, created to "effectively design, fund, and implement development and foreign assistance as part of a broader foreign policy" every four years. It is the first such effort for the State Department, which is not known for a culture of planning, and is modeled after a planning document produced by the Defense Department that reassesses and guides strategy on a recurring basis. ...

The review comes as at a time when the State Department is facing existential questions about its utility to American foreign policy, and some aren't so sure that it will be as influential as Slaughter believes. In a provocative article last month for Foreign Policy magazine, public-diplomacy specialist Matt Armstrong called the agency "broken and paralyzed, unable to respond to the new 21st-Century paradigm" where both state and non-state actors influence the global agenda. "The QDDR will ultimately be just a document. What it spurs will be the real test," Armstrong, whose article urged radical departmental restructuring, said in an interview. "As we know from the struggle for minds and wills around the world today, words only go so far." ...

Only one policy option has been ruled out: dissolving USAID and moving development work to the State Department. "There will be no merger," Slaughter said. "Secretary Clinton has made clear she wants a strong AID, a well-resourced AID, [and] wants diplomacy and development well-integrated."

Armstrong has a similar focus, but he wondered how thoroughly the QDDR would adopt the critique. "A focus of the QDDR seems to be State's ability to play well with others," he said. "But creating more plugs and sockets to connect with other agencies will be of little value if the internal bureaucratic friction that inhibits agility and creativity are not addressed." He said that the department would need to abandon its bureaucratic "emphasis on national borders"- the State Department is primarily organized around countries, rather than transnational phenomena -- if it wants to become "become an effective alternative and counterweight to DOD."